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Limit the occurrence of account hijacks with recovery phone number: Google

May 24, 2019

Damon McCoy, professor of computer science and engineering at NYU Tandon and Ph.D. student Periwinkle Doerfler contributed to the research cited in this article.
Recent research from Google reveals that users can enhance their online security by adding a recovery phone number to their respective accounts. Google worked in tandem with New York University and The University of California, San Diego on a yearlong study where they researched ways to combat targeted attacks and other security challenges. The team concluded the study by stating that during their research, simply adding a recovery phone number to the Google account can block up to 100% automated bots, 96% of phishing attacks and 66% of targeted attacks.

Google wants your phone number — should you provide it?

May 24, 2019

Damon McCoy, professor of computer science and engineering at NYU Tandon and Ph.D. student Periwinkle Doerfler contributed to the research cited in the this article.
… The reading in question being a posting on the Google security blog by researchers Kurt Thomas and Angelika Moscicki. They looked at research conducted by Google in association with New York University and the University of California to try and determine the impact that basic account hygiene can have on security. The year-long study covered both the broader threatscape as well as targeted attacks and determined that one simple security proactive measure can prevent the vast majority of account hijacking attempts.

Your Guide to KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU

May 24, 2019

Following on the heels of DockerCon SF, the team is packing their bags and heading to Barcelona for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU from May 20- 23. … KubeCon will also provide a great opportunity to learn from industry experts and hear from those working with Kubernetes for their production applications: Intro: TUF / Notary – Justin Cappos, NYU [Tandon School of Engineering] & Justin Cormack, Docker – This talk provides an accessible overview of two CNCF projects (Notary and TUF), that provide what has been roundly described as the most secure mechanism for distributing software.

How Trump is outspending every 2020 democrat on Facebook

May 24, 2019

Article cites research by Damon McCoy, assistant professor of computer science and engineering and Laura Edelson, a doctoral student, at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering.
President Trump’s re-election campaign has spent far more than any single Democratic presidential candidate on Facebook advertising, reprising a strategy that was central to his 2016 victory.

CCS Co-Chair Randy Milch participates in Cyber Security Panel at State of the Market 2019

May 16, 2019

Randy Milch

On May 14, Youth INC hosted hundreds of business executives at its annual State of the Market conference, “bringing together financial, business, and political luminaries to discuss pressing topics that impact the investment landscape – all to support Youth INC.” CCS Co-Chair Randy Milch participated in the day’s events as a part of the Cyber Security Panel, where he discussed cyber risk.

You can read more in the press release.

Notable women in technology [Jelena Kovačević]

May 14, 2019

In 2018, Jelena Kovačević became the first woman to head NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering since its founding in 1854. She has also taught at Columbia University and at Carnegie Mellon University, where she headed the Electrical and Computer Engineering department and taught biomedical engineering. From 2008 to 2012, Kovačević served as a regular member of the NIH Enabling Bioanalytical and Imaging Technologies (EBIT) Study Section and has also been a member-at-large of the IEEE Signal Processing Society Board of Governors. In 2016, she served on the organizing committee for the Graph Signal Processing Workshop held at the University of Pennsylvania.

NYU Engineering offers a MicroMasters in Integrated Media on edX

April 19, 2019

The NYU Tandon School of Engineering joined the edX Consortium, and its first offering will be a MicroMasters in Integrated Media. This program, which is open for enrollment, consists of three courses followed by a capstone project (for a total of $900). “Our partnership with edX allows us to offer yet another pathway to becoming a lifelong learner,” said NYU Tandon Dean Jelena Kovacevic. “NYU Tandon’s Integrated Digital Media program provides a wholly unique combination of theory and practice that sets it apart from other digital media offerings,” said R. Luke DuBois and Scott Fitzgerald, co-directors of the school’s IDM program. “We consider this MicroMaster’s to be only the beginning, and look forward to partnering with edX in the future,” stated Nasir Memon, NYU Tandon’s associate dean for online learning.

Artificial Neural Network: Artificial Neural Network Approach to Predict the Elastic Modulus from Dynamic Mechanical Analysis Results (Adv. Theory Simul. 4/2019)

April 11, 2019

In article number 1800131, Xianbo Xu and Nikhil Gupta report on combining an artificial neural network and viscoelastic theory to recover the elastic modulus of graphene‐reinforced composites from dynamic mechanical analysis results. Instead of conducting numerous tensile tests, the method can predict the elastic modulus over a range of strain rates and temperatures from a single specimen.

STEM programs in US still working towards gender parity

April 11, 2019

Fei Chen is a Ph.D student at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering, developing methods to make 3D printing technology more secure. … Fei is among a growing cohort of women, working under Professor Nikhil Gupta of NYU Tandon’s Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering department. … NYU Tandon said it leads the curve when it comes to recruiting women, who account for 33 percent of post-graduate students and 37 percent of undergrads, more than the national average. “There is a huge need in the U.S. for professionals in STEM fields, engineering and computer science as well as technology fields, so we want to make sure that we are filling those jobs with as many as possible, so we want to take advantage of the whole population,” said Kristen Day, associate dean at NYU Tandon.

Has the World’s First Unhackable Chip Arrived?

April 11, 2019

Ozgur Sinanoglu is a Research Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at NYU Tandon School of Engineering.
Ozgur Sinanoglu is obsessed with computer chips — a passion born at age 10 when his father brought home a Commodore 64. Now 42 and the associate dean of engineering at New York University Abu Dhabi, Sinanoglu claims that he and his colleagues have designed an unhackable chip. … Hired as a visiting assistant professor under the guidance of Ramesh Karri, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering, Sinanoglu got hooked on the challenge of staying ahead of bad actors with malicious intent. “It’s a whole different game,” he says, one that requires constantly outpacing hackers’ creativity and intelligence. “It’s actually a more fun game,” he’s quick to add with a grin.

Desperate Rental Market Leads to Housing Scams

April 11, 2019

Features research led by Damon McCoy, professor of computer science and engineering at NYU Tandon.
As the summer season approaches, a proliferation of housing scams in the form of false online rental advertisements has caused headaches, dashed hopes and, in some cases, led to substantial loss of money for desperate workers and vacationers already saddled with the difficult task of navigating the summer rental market. A study done by NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering showed that Craigslist fails to identify more than half of the scam rental listings on the site’s pages and often lets suspicious postings linger for as long as 20 hours before removing them. The researchers estimate there are thousands of false housing advertisements on the website throughout the country.

The Size Of The Fingerprint Biometric Sensor: Why Bigger Is Better

April 11, 2019

Article features research by Nasir Memon, professor in the department of Computer Science and Engineering at NYU Tandon.
… Whilst there is no denying the fingerprint biometric smart card is reaching its inflection point, one barrier to mass market adoption is the cost of the sensors needed to take each person’s biometric fingerprint data. To combat this, many producers of these sensors have looked to limit costs by reducing the size of the sensors used. … the smaller the sensor the more times an enrollee needs to touch the sensor in order to capture an image of the whole surface of the finger. Some manufacturers are getting around this problem by partially enrolling the fingerprint, by adding a fragment of the fingerprint and then adding to data to the template, once the card is in use. According to a new study from New York University Tandon School of Engineering, ‘partial’ fingerprints are less likely to be unique than full prints, making smaller fingerprint-based security systems less secure and more vulnerable than previously thought.

With the proliferation of biometric scanning, some hidden risks

April 11, 2019

Features the research of Nasir Memon, and Julian Togelius, professors in the department of Computer Science and Engineering at NYU Tandon.
… A team of researchers at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering, for instance, created an algorithm to not only simulate a person’s fingerprint but to create a single print that can masquerade as several others and fool scanners as often as 20 percent of the time — all without replicating an actual print. … Much like a master key can fit many different locks, the NYU Tandon [School of Engineering]algorithm, called DeepMasterPrints, focuses on generating artificial prints that contain enough common fingerprint characteristics to allow them to fool fingerprint sensors into believing they’re a match. In order to do this, researchers use a three-step process.

Trump’s Facebook ads focus on Schumer, Pelosi and the border wall as Democrats play catch-up

April 11, 2019

Article cites research led by Damon McCoy, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering.
Trump spent $3.6 million on Facebook ads from Dec. 30 to March 23, according to data compiled by researchers at the Online Advertising Transparency Project. … The data provides fresh insight into the themes and strategies that the Trump campaign is employing in the earliest days of the 2020 election cycle.

Data, Rivalry and Government Power: Machine Learning Is Changing Everything

April 4, 2019

The emerging wave of technological innovation centered around data science and machine learning is poised not only to upend economies and societies in yet unforeseen ways, it also looks set to trigger a new era of geopolitical rivalry, especially between the United States and China. Steven Weber and Gabriel Nicholas, CCS Fellow, explain what is unfolding and why it is so important.

 

The Risks of Marrying ‘Smart’ Technology With ‘Dumb’ Machines

March 28, 2019

Investigators probing two deadly crashes of Boeing Co. 737 MAX airliners are grappling with a hybrid of old and new technology, where a complex piece of software controls hydraulic pumps and motors similar to those used when Lyndon Johnson was president. … “There’s a bigger temptation not to test things when you’re just making a little change by adding automation,” said Justin Cappos, a professor of computer science at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering. With every adaptation, the potential for problems might accumulate without anyone noticing. “You’re kind of boiling the frog,” he said.

Uncertain Regulatory Theory and Law Hampers Consumer IoT Cybersecurity

March 20, 2019

Poor regulation of the consumer IoT electronics sector compounds the negative market incentives discussed in the first part of this series. While standards for IoT devices are taking shape in some sectors of the U.S. economy, no similar regime has been developed for the broad consumer IoT electronics market. Moreover, little expert consensus has developed as to what such a regime would look like even if the political will existed to implement it. Such a regime would also have to contend with the challenges of regulating a market where many key actors are overseas. These challenges need not pose an insuperable barrier to developing a sound regulatory regime but do suggest that far more thought needs to be put into understanding what IoT regulation would actually look like. Written by NYU Cyber Scholar Samuel G. Bieler

Market Dynamics Encourage Weak Security in Consumer IoT

March 20, 2019

Cybersecurity in U.S. consumer Internet of Things (“IoT”) electronics is remarkably weak and this vulnerability is driven, in large part, from the economics behind these devices. Consumers lack the knowledge to make cybersecurity-informed purchasing decisions even if they are willing to do so – and many are not, particularly for low-end items. This means manufacturers are not rewarded for building good cybersecurity into their devices and may even be punished. Developers who take the time to build security into their devices may lose the race to the market and the advantages that come with getting a product there first. Collectively, these factors make it unlikely that market dynamics alone will improve cybersecurity in the consumer IoT market. Policy interventions will be necessary to mitigate some of these economic incentives. Written by NYU Cyber Scholar Samuel G. Bieler

Six NYU Tandon Researchers Garner Prestigious CAREER Awards

March 14, 2019

This year, six young principal investigators from NYU Tandon garnered prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Awards, given in support of early-career faculty members who have the potential to serve as academic role models and to lead advances in the mission of their department or organization. That’s an especially noteworthy feat considering that the school’s engineering faculty has just 80 members. It’s an impressive percentage; an inspiring group of engineers; an exciting array of world-changing research; and, given that three of the six are women, solid proof of the strides Tandon has made in closing the STEM gender gap.

Cyber Fellows participate in cyber defense simulation

March 14, 2019

The NYU Tandon [School of Engineering] cyber fellows program hosted its first-ever cyber defense simulation on Tuesday. It gave graduate students a chance to use what they have learned in class to defend themselves against a simulated attack. Students had to detect and mitigate eight threats in real time. Professors say the goal was for students to walk away feeling more comfortable defending security systems before they head into the workforce.

Why 3D Printing Is Going to Need Blockchain

February 25, 2019

Article refers to research by NYU Tandon Professor Nikhil Gupta and Ph.D. student Fei Chen in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  
Research has already shown 3D printing has a growing need for cybersecurity. Researchers from New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering for example have found that there are serious security issues around 3D printing that could present significant safety hazards due to counterfeit parts and products, or products being deliberately printed with hidden flaws and built-in failures.

Artificial Neural Networks Streamline Materials Testing

February 14, 2019

Optimizing advanced composites for specific end uses can be costly and time-consuming, requiring manufacturers to test many samples to arrive at the best formulation. Investigators at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have designed a machine learning system employing artificial neural networks (ANN) capable of extrapolating from data derived from just one sample … The work, led by Nikhil Gupta, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at NYU Tandon … is detailed in “Artificial Neural Network Approach to Predict the Elastic Modulus from Dynamic Mechanical Analysis Results,” which will be featured on the inside cover of the journal Advanced Theory and Simulations.

Cyber stalking: Is your cell phone being used against you?

February 14, 2019

The New York City Mayor’s Office to End Domestic and Gender Based Violence is expanding a new program in coordination with students at Cornell Tech and NYU Tandon School of Engineering to combat cyber stalking. The computer program, developed by students and recently put into use at the city’s family justice centers, is capable of scanning phones and other mobile devices for signs of stalking. “It’s very hard to look at a phone very quickly and figure out whether you are being stalked,” said NYU Tandon’s Damon McCoy, who has been involved in the development of this new program.

Quick Response Codes in 3D-Printed Structures

February 11, 2019

So far, schemes to authenticate genuine products have relied on traditional methods such as stamping a serial number or tracking code on the parts’ surface, but they are easy to remove or duplicate. Researchers from the New York University have developed an intriguing alternative. Led by Prof. Nikhil Gupta, a team of researchers from the NYU Tandon School of Engineering and NYU Abu Dhabi converted quick response (QR) codes, bar codes, and other passive tags into 3D features hidden within the part in a way that they does not compromise the part’s integrity. This embedded code is scanned by a micro-computed tomography scanner for authentication purposes.

Researchers use artificial neural networks to streamline materials testing

February 11, 2019

Optimizing advanced composites for specific end uses can be costly and time consuming, requiring manufacturers to test many samples to arrive at the best formulation. Investigators at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have designed a machine learning system employing artificial neural networks (ANN) capable of extrapolating from data derived from just one sample. … The work, led by Nikhil Gupta, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at NYU Tandon, with Ph.D. student Xianbo Xu and collaborators at 2-D graphene materials manufacturer GrapheneCa, is detailed in ‘Artificial Neural Network Approach to Predict the Elastic Modulus from Dynamic Mechanical Analysis Results,’ which will be featured on the inside cover of the journal Advanced Theory and Simulations.

Facebook Moves to Block Ad Transparency Tools — Including Ours

February 11, 2019

A number of organizations, including ProPublica, have developed tools to let the public see exactly how Facebook users are being targeted by advertisers. Now, Facebook has quietly made changes to its site that stop those efforts. … Facebook has also developed another tool that it says will allow researchers to analyze political ads more easily. That tool, called an API, is in “beta” and restricted to a few participants … One researcher with access said the API is not sufficient. It only allows searching by keyword, said Laura Edelson, a researcher at New York University [Tandon School of Engineering] who studies online political advertising. “You can only find ads about things that you already know you’re looking for,” Edelson said. “So any kind of emerging activity is potentially undiscoverable.”

Google Follows Facebook And Twitter With Political Ad Transparency Programme

February 11, 2019

Ahead of India’s general election, which will take place in the coming months, Google has followed the example of Facebook and Twitter in promising greater transparency about the people behind political advertising. According to a report, the company said it will provide details of advertisers as well as the money spent on such ads. … “Simply put, all these ad networks weren’t designed to be transparent,” Damon McCoy, a professor of computer science and engineering at NYU [Tandon School of Engineering] whose team analysed ads with political content between May and July 2018, told Politico. “They’ve having to do a lot of jury-rigging of their ad networks to make everything transparent.”

3D Printing Security

February 11, 2019

As more 3D printed products reach the markets so does the increased risk for counterfeit parts. Nikhil Gupta is an Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering. He joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss a new security measure using three dimensional quick response codes.

NYU Tandon’s Cyber Fellows Are a (Cyber) Force to Be Reckoned With

January 31, 2019

When Brookhaven Lab hosted the recent Department of Energy CyberForce Competition, members of the intensive NYU Tandon CyberFellows program were there to go head to head with other aspiring cybersecurity professionals from around the country. Tasked with defending a simulated energy infrastructure network from attack, the Tandon team skillfully corrected vulnerabilities; stayed a step ahead of the hackers; and proved that they’re well-prepared to help fill the 3.5 million cybersecurity positions experts predict will be needed by 2021. CyberFellows is an elite online MS program that costs just $16,000.

Tandon Research on 3D Printing Security Ranks at the Top

January 31, 2019

Just like any technology linked to the internet, 3D printers can be hacked, and computer design files can be stolen. Nikhil Gupta, an associate professor of mechanical engineering, and his colleagues created a method of hiding 3D QR (Quick Response) tags in printed parts as a way to prove their legitimacy. The news was cited as one of the top 10 most exciting developments of the year by top industry publication 3Dprint.com.

Rachel Greenstadt, Renowned Computer Scientist Joins Tandon

January 31, 2019

who recently joined the computer science and engineering faculty, is top researcher in trustworthy intelligent systems — autonomous computer networks whose integrity can be verified. Greenstadt, who earned undergraduate and graduate degrees from MIT and Harvard, holds a U.S. Department of Homeland Security Fellowship; earned a PET Award for Outstanding Research in Privacy Enhancing Technologies; and a National Science Foundation CAREER Award. She is also a member of the DARPA Computer Science Study Group…

New NYU program creating troops for cybercrime defense

January 24, 2019

‘We really need more security professionals— the very foundation of our society is being threatened,” says Nasir Memon, a professor at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering. Memon is part of a multi-pronged effort at NYU to meet that need, with several online and on-site cybersecurity programs for newcomers as well as mid-career professionals, as well as financial assistance to help students attain that training. Memon says the school hopes to eventually train more than 1,000 cyber security professionals a year…. NYU’s approach includes a focus on several key areas: affordability … flexibility … industry …  partnerships … openness … community.

How domestic abusers use smartphones to spy on their partners

January 24, 2019

More and more people who commit violence against their intimate partners are using technology to make their victims’ lives worse. … News media, academic researchers, and victim advocates have long acknowledged the threat of spyware in domestic abuse situations. But our research [conducted by NYU Tandon faculty and students] brings to light the ease with which spyware can be deployed by abusers, and the broad scope of software usable as spyware.

Tandon Researcher Co-Authors One of 2018’s Top Papers on 3D Printing

January 24, 2019

With the worldwide market for 3D-printed parts now a $5 billion business…One of the major sectors vying to remain on the cutting edge of additive manufacturing (AM), as 3D printing is also known, is aerospace, and as the editors of the news organization 3DPrint.com wrote, “It would take a very long time to list all of the amazing news in aerospace 3D printing in 2018.” Still, they compiled a list of the 10 most exciting developments of the year, and prominent among them was research conducted by Nikhil Gupta, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at NYU Tandon, who along with his colleagues discovered a way to prove the provenance of a 3D-printed part by employing QR (Quick Response) codes in an innovative way for unique device identification. The paper — co-authored by Fei Chen, a doctoral student under Gupta; and joint NYU Tandon and NYU Abu Dhabi researchers Nektarios Tsoutsos, Michail Maniatakos and Khaled Shahin — was published in the journal Advanced Engineering Materials and details how the group exploited the layer-by-layer AM printing process to turn QR codes into a game of 3D chess.

DeepMasterPrints Developed To Access Smartphones Via Hacking

January 24, 2019

Researchers at New York University [Tandon School of Engineering] and Michigan State University have invented new artificial fingerprints, which they call DeepMasterPrints for hacking fingerprint sensor-enabled smartphones. According to a report by CNBC, the fake fingerprints, with the help of machine learning double as a ‘Masterkey’ to access one out of three smartphones which come with fingerprint scanners. The researchers involved in the new development are Philip Bontrager, Aditi Roy, Julian Togelius, Nasir Memon, and Arun Ross.

Biometrics in 2019: Increased Security or New Attack Vector?

January 24, 2019

Research cited is by CSE faculty Nasir Memon and Aditi Roy.
Just two years ago, the industry began seeing the vulnerabilities of biometric authentication when researchers at Michigan State University discovered a simple and inexpensive way to print the image of a fingerprint using a standard inkjet printer. And last year, researchers at New York University’s (NYU) Tandon School of Engineering boasted over the ability to match anyone’s fingerprints using digitally altered “masterprints.” On the individual and personal level, it may be impossible to prevent biometric data from being broadly collected and used. All but three U.S. states allow software to identify an individual using images taken without their consent while in public. And in many cases, people are readily volunteering their biometric data as a way to gain easier access to jobs, homes, cars and personal devices. However, they must insist that their data be responsibly and securely stored and used, which will ultimately be addressed through legislation for biometric privacy laws like those in Washington, Illinois, and Texas.

Government shutdown poses cybersecurity threat

January 24, 2019

The partial government shutdown, which is delaying companies’ plans for initial public offerings, also could be making the nation more vulnerable to cyberattacks. The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, part of the Department of Homeland Security, has furloughed 43% of its staff—more than 1,500 of its 3,541 employees.…The shutdown also doesn’t help with the long-term problem of finding enough qualified cybersecurity professionals—and persuading them to work in government, where the pay is considerably lower than in industry. “There’s a massive talent shortage in cybersecurity,” said Justin Cappos, a professor at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, which is expanding its cybersecurity program. “These [DHS] organizations are already facing an uphill battle recruiting talent.”

Facebook investigates group backed by Reid Hoffman

January 24, 2019

Research project led by CSE Professor Damon McCoy.
Facebook said it is investigating whether an organization backed by billionaire and Democratic mega-donor Reid Hoffman violated the social media giant’s policies when it set up a series of misleading news pages in a bid to target U.S. voters with left-leaning political messages. The probe focuses on News for Democracy, whose Facebook ads and affiliated pages about sports, religion, the American flag and other topics were viewed millions of times during the 2018 congressional midterm election, according to an analysis of the company ad archive conducted by New York University….The study by the New York University Tandon School of Engineering found that News for Democracy’s ads garnered at least 16 million impressions, defined as views or clicks, over just a two-week period in September. The pages are still active. “These groups find a community, they try to build it with nonpolitical content, and once they have that community established, they start inserting political messages,” said Laura Edelson, one of the NYU researchers.

Artificial Fingerprints Can Be Used For Hacking, Researchers Say

January 10, 2019

Researchers have created artificial fingerprints that they say can be used to hack into smartphones and other devices. These “DeepMasterPrints” are machine-learning methods that act as a master key, according to the researchers from New York University [Tandon School of Engineering] and Michigan State University, CNBC reports. The researchers — Philip Bontrager, Aditi Roy, Julian Togelius, Nasir Memon and Arun Ross — told CNBC that “phones and many more devices don’t capture your entire fingerprint.” They add: “There’s not enough space on the device, so they capture a partial fingerprint — which is not as secure as the full image….”

Internet billionaire Reid Hoffman apologizes for funding a group tied to disinformation in Alabama race

January 10, 2019

Article cites research by Damon McCoy, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering.
Internet billionaire Reid Hoffman apologized on Wednesday for funding a group linked to a “highly disturbing” effort that spread disinformation during last year’s Alabama special election for U.S. Senate, but said he was not aware that his money was being used for this purpose. Throughout the 2018 election season, Hoffman directed his cash toward other organizations that aimed to target conservatives on Facebook. Central to that effort was News for Democracy, whose ads garnered at least 16 million impressions on Facebook over a two-week period in September, according to researchers at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering.

Facebook is investigating the political pages and ads of another group backed by Reid Hoffman

January 10, 2019

Article cites research led by Damon McCoy, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering.
Facebook said it is investigating whether an organization backed by Internet billionaire and Democratic megadonor Reid Hoffman violated the social media giant’s policies when it set up several misleading news pages in a bid to target U.S. voters with left-leaning political messages. … The probe focuses on News for Democracy, whose Facebook ads and affiliated pages … were viewed millions of times during the 2018 midterm elections, according to an analysis of the company ad archive conducted by New York University [Tandon School of Engineering]. “These groups find a community, they try to build it with nonpolitical content, and once they have that community established, they start inserting political messages,” said Laura Edelson, one of the NYU researchers..

Security 101: How Businesses and Schools Bridge the Talent Gap

January 4, 2019

Some institutions aim to offer real-life experience through competition. New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering, for example, annually hosts a student-run cybersecurity competition dubbed CSAW. This year, its 15th running, saw 3,500 teams from more than 100 countries complete challenges designed by New York City’s top ethical hackers. “You cannot really teach about security by lecturing in a classroom,” says Nasir Memon, professor in the department of computer science and engineering at NYU Tandon. “You have to understand how attackers work.”

Intel funds NYU Abu Dhabi cyber security research

January 4, 2019

American tech giant Intel has awarded NYU Abu Dhabi a three-year, $300,000 grant to help with research into new ways of securely testing and configuring computer chips by third-party companies, it was announced on Sunday. The research, being conducted by NYU Abu Dhabi Associate Dean of Engineering [and research assistant professor in the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at NYU Tandon] Ozgur Sinanoglu, allows tech companies to obfuscate security critical data – such as the chips serial ID – by using a secret key pre-loaded onto the chip.

Researchers develop artificial fingerprints, claiming they could hack into a third of smartphones

January 4, 2019

Artificial fingerprints have been developed by researchers who say they could one day be used to hack into everyday devices. … Researchers from New York University [Tandon School of Engineering] and Michigan State University successfully generated what they call “DeepMasterPrints” earlier this year. … Philip Bontrager, Aditi Roy, Julian Togelius, Nasir Memon [professors of computer science and engineering at NYU Tandon] and Arun Ross, the researchers behind the study, said the way fingerprints were recognized on smartphones and other devices was often problematic.

Legal and Compliance: 3 Questions for CISOs

January 4, 2019

What are three burning questions regarding legal and compliance issues that enterprise security leaders should ponder as they head into 2019? Ed Amoroso, former CISO of AT&T and current CEO of TAG Cyber, outlines the questions and possible answers. … Amoroso also has been adjunct professor of computer science at the Stevens Institute of Technology for the past 29 years, as well as a research professor in the computer science department at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering and a senior adviser within the applied physics laboratory at Johns Hopkins University.

Hackers Can Destroy Your Business. Here’s How to Stop Them.

December 11, 2018

CCS Co-Chair Randy Milch was featured in a video from Futurism on the war against hackers.

AI-generated fingerprints could soon fool biometric systems

December 6, 2018

… Humans are notoriously bad at creating secure passwords. … we’ve fixed the problem, at least somewhat, by introducing a slew of new devices that rely on biometric authentication, whether in the form of fingerprints, voice recognition, or facial scanning. … Researchers at New York University [Tandon School of Engineering] and Michigan State University, however, have their doubts about whether biometrics alone are enough. … At issue is the way in which most fingerprint sensors work. Previous research by NYU professor Nasir Memon detailed a fatal flaw in some system. Rather than using a full fingerprint, most relied on partial fingerprints to confirm identity.

How To Cash In On Cyber Monday

December 6, 2018

This video includes an interview with Justin Cappos, Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at NYU Tandon. (starts at 0:57) 
… Online shoppers are not just on their computers. New research shows 1 in 3 purchases were made on their smartphone. “Going to sites that are more reputable, especially those that tend to be more technology focused and maybe have a reasonable security staff gives you a greater degree of assurance,” says Cappos.

Marriott data breach: Class-action suit filed; experts ask why it wasn’t caught earlier

December 6, 2018

This video includes an interview with Justin Cappos, Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at NYU Tandon
Cybersecurity expert and NYU professor Justin Cappos says the security breach that compromised the information of as many as 500 million guests shows that Marriott’s Starwood hotels simply did not care about customer security and privacy.

The shaky world of online ad transparency

December 6, 2018

… Major ad platforms like Google, Facebook and Twitter each launched their own versions of transparency platforms, which detail online political spending — a $1.9 billion industry in 2018, according to a projection from Kip Cassino of the ad-tracking firm Borrell Associates. … “Simply put, all these ad networks weren’t designed to be transparent,” said Damon McCoy, a professor of computer science and engineering at NYU [Tandon School of Engineering], who has tracked online ads as part of the school’s [Online Ad] Transparency project. “They’ve having to do a lot of jury-rigging of their ad networks to make everything transparent.”

BlackBerry’s acquisition of Cylance raises eyebrows in the security community

December 4, 2018

BlackBerry, which has rebranded as a security company as its mobile handset business fades, purchased Cylance, the machine-learning based anti-malware company, for $1.4 billion dollars last week. … “It’s possible they [BlackBerry] could add machine learning-specific backdoors of the style we proposed last year that makes it ignore their own state-sponsored malware,’ Brendan Dolan-Gavitt, an assistant professor in the computer science and engineering department at New York University [Tandon School of Engineering], tells CSO.

AI skeleton key fingerprint fools 1 in 5 ID systems

December 4, 2018

Article features research by a team including Philip Bontrager, a Ph.D. student at the NYU Game Innovation Lab at NYU Tandon, and lab director Julian Togelius and Nasir Memon, professors in the department of computer science and engineering.
“These experiments demonstrate the need for multi-factor authentication and should be a wake-up call for device manufacturers about the potential for artificial fingerprint attacks,” said researcher Philip Bontrager. … The work builds on earlier research, also at NYU Tandon, which described how fingerprint-based systems use partial fingerprints, rather than full ones, to confirm identity. “Devices typically allow users to enrol several different finger images, and a match for any saved partial print is enough to confirm identity,” said the university.

1st Place Policy Prize at CSAW Global Cyber Competition Goes to EMCS ’19-based Team

December 4, 2018

We are proud to announce that a team of four members from the Brown University Executive Master in Cybersecurity (EMCS) Class of 2019 won first place in the policy category at CSAW’18, the world’s largest student-led hacking and security competition. The New York University Tandon School of Engineering hosted the policy portion of CSAW in the U.S., one of the event’s six international venues which combined totaled over 20,000 participants worldwide. Competing at NYU against 28 teams comprised of Ph.D, Masters, law school, and undergraduate students, the team chose as their topic, Policy Recommendations for Securing the U.S. Elections.

Tunisia to host CSAW regional finals, one of the biggest cybersecurity competitions (Translated from French)

December 4, 2018

Tunisia has just joined the international Cyber ??Security Awareness Worldwide (CSAW) competition in 2018, and will host the regional competition at the Tunis Telecommunications College (Sup’Com). … The Cyber ??Security Awareness Worldwide (CSAW), first organized in 2003 by Professor Nasir Memon of the New York University Tandon School of Engineering, and run by students, was initially a grassroots competition before expanding in just a few years to operate on a global scale.

IBERO will host the finals of CSAW 18 in Mexico

December 4, 2018

For the first time in 15 years, the best Mexican cybersecurity students will compete in the final round of Cyber ??Security Awareness Worldwide (CSAW) at the Universidad Iberoamericana Mexico City, from November 8 to 11, 2018. They will also participate simultaneously against hackers from different countries. CSAW was founded in 2003 by the New York University Tandon School of Engineering and is the largest cybersecurity competition in the world. The competition is developed by university students and graduates of both Tandon’s OSIRIS Lab and the Center for Cyber ??Security.

Competitors Challenged to Hack ATM, 3D Printers at 15th Annual CSAW Conference

December 4, 2018

… This year, participants breached design files to 3D print counterfeit parts, and a team of five hacked an ATM, leaving with $2,000 in cash. But these cyber whizzes are not wanted criminals—they were competitors in the 15th Annual Cyber Security Awareness Week, or CSAW, conference hosted by the New York University Center for Cybersecurity at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering. “Once you think like hackers, it becomes better for you to come up with better defenses,” explained Ramesh Karri, NYU professor of electrical and computer engineering, and founder of CSAW’s Embedded Security Challenge. Over the decade-and-a-half that CSAW has challenged participants to “think like hackers,” it has grown from a humble “capture the flag” hacker competition to an international event hosted in six countries, with a wide variety of cyber-related competitions and over 20,000 participants worldwide, according to event founder, professor of computer science and engineering Nasir Memon.

RPI students earn top honors during Cyber Security Awareness Week

December 4, 2018

For a second year in a row, a team of students from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute earned top honors at the 15th anniversary edition of Cyber Security Awareness Week. A team of four computer science students from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute once again took home top honors at the 15th anniversary edition of Cyber Security Awareness Week (CSAW), the world’s largest student-run cyber security event. Hosted by the New York University Tandon School of Engineering, this year’s event was held November 8-10 and featured international competitions, workshops, and industry events.

BlackBerry’s acquisition of Cylance raises eyebrows in the security community

December 4, 2018

Backdoors in machine learning have gotten little attention, but researchers have demonstrated proofs of concept for how such backdoors might work. ‘It’s possible they could add machine learning-specific backdoors of the style we proposed last year that makes it ignore their own state-sponsored malware,’ Brendan Dolan-Gavitt, an assistant professor in the computer science and engineering department at New York University [Tandon School of Engineering], tells CSO. ‘We showed that when you’re training something like a deep learning system you can teach it to recognize specific triggers and then misclassify any inputs that have that trigger,’ Dolan-Gavitt adds. ‘We haven’t looked at anti-malware systems specifically, but I think it would work.’

Was Your Voting Machine Hacked? Without More User-Friendly Devices, We May Not Know

November 19, 2018

The OSET Institute logged more than 900 individual reports of voting issues, according to the TrustTheVote Project’s first PollWatch campaign. But the problems weren’t the anticipated cyberattacks. Written by our Cybersecurity Service Scholar Marc Canellas.

Federal Researchers Simulate Power Grid Cyberattack, Find Holes in Response Plan

November 15, 2018

Ramesh Karri and Farshad Khorrami, professors in the department of electrical and computer engineering at NYU Tandon, and Michail Maniatakos, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU Tandon were involved in the tests featured in this article.
… There is evidence that nation-state attackers are already targeting power grids and other critical infrastructure. … Grid operators and government workers conduct frequent tabletop exercises to determine who would do what during a cyberattack, but those activities lack the depth and urgency of a real-world scenario and might not reveal problems in response plans, said Walter Weiss, the program manager for the Defense Department’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, who led the exercises.

VIDEO – Future European cyber security ace clash in Valencia (Translated from French)

November 15, 2018

For the second year in a row, the Esisar Engineering School in Valence (Drôme) is hosting the European Cyber ??Security Awareness Week finals from 8th to 10th November. …These future cybersecurity professionals … compete in a global competition. Cyber ??Security Awareness Week pits 107 countries in the early stages of qualifying. Next are the final events in each major region: New York for the North American continent, Ariana in Tunisia for the Middle East and the Maghreb, Mexico for Mexico, Kanpur for India, and Valencia for the European continent. From this Thursday until Saturday, the teams of twelve European countries are therefore at L’Esisar, in Valencia.

At CSAW, big cybersecurity contest: ‘It’s like chess’ (Translated from French)

November 15, 2018

… This weekend took place in Valencia but also simultaneously in … Kanpur and New York [University, Tandon School of Engineering], the final of the CSAW. This is the largest academic cybersecurity competition in the world. The goal: 12,000 future cybersecurity professionals are invited to hack computer systems and connected objects, to reveal the flaws to their designers. Adele Day, 22, is a student in her 5th year at the National Institute of Applied Sciences (INSA) in Bourges. She studies in the sector ‘security and information technologies’. First interested in science and mathematics, then in computer science, she discovered cybersecurity a little later.

The CSAW, a showcase for the gifted ‘hacking’ (Translated from French)

November 15, 2018

They pirate by challenge and are courted by recruiters in a booming sector: a hundred computer enthusiasts competed this weekend in Valencia at CSAW, the largest academic cybersecurity competition in the world. The European finals of this ambitious ‘hackathon’ was held on the campus of … Esisar from Thursday to Saturday and simultaneously in Abu Dhabi, Kanpur (India) and New York [University, Tandon School of Engineering] (where the competition was created in 2003). ‘The aim of Cyber ??Security Awareness Week (CSAW) is to demonstrate the security flaws of a site or a network by attacking it, and then develop appropriate countermeasures.’ … explained to AFP David Hély of the CSAW organizing committee and teacher – researcher at Esisar.

World’s Biggest Student-Led Cybersecurity Games Announce Winners of CSAW 2018

November 15, 2018

The 15th anniversary edition of the world’s largest student-led hacking and protection competitions, CSAW, closed Saturday at universities across four continents with record-breaking participation in the face of reports of shortfalls of up to 3 million experts globally. The founder of CSAW, the New York University Tandon School of Engineering, welcomed 130 student finalists in seven separate competitions, and another 267 competed in the final rounds hosted by schools in France, India, Israel, and Mexico. … The Borough President proclaimed November 8 as NYU Tandon CSAW 15th Anniversary Day in Brooklyn.

Discovering the trials of cybersecurity geniuses (translated from French)

November 15, 2018

The cybersecurity sector, which is booming, now has 24,000 employees in the country. The turnover of the companies specialized in the protection of the networks increases by 10% per year. In a competition [at venues worldwide, including NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering], young cybersecurity talents challenge themselves to hack into the computer system of a fictional company.

Hundreds Participate in Tandon’s Cyber Security Competition

November 15, 2018

With more than one in four organizations experiencing hacks and a predicted global shortage of two million cyber security professionals by 2019, NYU is working to train the future of cyber workers. This past weekend, the NYU Center for Cybersecurity held its 15th annual Cyber Security Awareness Week at the MakerSpace at the Tandon School of Engineering. The event spanned from Nov. 8 to Nov. 11 and was simultaneously held at six global sites; participants from the United States and Canada competed out of the MakerSpace. The multifaceted event consisted of several competitions, workshops and an industry fair.

Searching for the Best Student Hackers in the Nation

November 15, 2018

Top student computer hackers have descended on NYU Tandon School of Engineering in Brooklyn for Cyber Security Awareness Week, known as CSAW. This is the largest student-led cybersecurity contest, which was founded by Nasir Memon [professor of computer science and engineering and associate dean for online learning at NYU Tandon].   

Inside CSAW, a Massive Student-Led Cybersecurity Competition

November 15, 2018

New York University’s CSAW, which calls itself the world’s largest student-run cybersecurity competition, this week announced the 397 high school, undergraduate, and graduate students from around the world who will enter its final round. CSAW started in, and is organized by, NYU‘s Tandon School of Engineering. This year, its 15th running, saw 3,500 teams from more than 100 countries enter the games. The remaining contenders will now travel to academic sites across four continents to compete in the finals. The competition was founded in 2003 as a small local event by Nasir Memon, an NYU [Tandon] professor of computer science and engineering. It has since expanded to include eight global events, all of which evolve to host challenges and contests that align with the changing threat landscape.

The Mad Dash to Find a Cybersecurity Force

November 15, 2018

…“Nationally, we graduate twice the number of psychology majors as opposed to engineers,” said Nasir Memon, professor and associate dean for online learning at the N.Y.U. Tandon School of Engineering. ..“So one of the things we did is start a bridge program, where we say, we don’t care what you did in your undergrad; you could have done physics, anthropology, anything, just come on in,” Professor Memon said. The welcome the school extends is in the form of an intense, four-month online program of computer science courses with a price of $1,500. If students pass, they are eligible for the full program. This year, 230 students were accepted into the bridge program, 22 percent of them women.

$10,000 Atlanta Cyber Challenge Winner Announced

November 12, 2018

NYU student Nick Gregory has won the $10,000 Atlanta Cyber Challenge. The announcement was made at a virtual check presentation ceremony held at the University of North Georgia’s Center for Cyber Operations Education. Gregory is a senior at NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering pursuing a Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science with a focus on Cybersecurity. DataPath and USI Insurance Services are co-sponsors of the $10,000 grand prize offered to cyber security students and professionals competing in this year’s challenge event.

Who paid for that political ad in your Facebook feed? It’s not always easy to figure out

November 12, 2018

Political advertisers are required to fill in a field that says who paid for the message in your news feed, but that does not necessarily tell you who they or their backers are. …A growing number of Facebook ads in the run-up to the election took advantage of that loophole to obscure or conceal the identity and political motives of who paid for them – and Facebook did not catch it. That allowed some Facebook pages to remain anonymous while stirring political discord. ..Facebook pages hawking ads that target Democrats or Republicans then bombard them with messaging from the other side of the aisle proliferated in the weeks before the midterm elections, according to Damon McCoy, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering. ‘Groups create these disingenuous, grassroots-looking communities on Facebook, and you can’t trace these damn things,’ he said. ‘There are so many of them, we can’t even catalog them all. They are popping up left and right.’

Search Narrows for World’s Top Student Hackers and Cybersecurity Protectors: Countdown to NYU CSAW Finals

November 1, 2018

After besting a record-breaking 3,500 teams from more than 100 countries, an elite corps of high school, college, and graduate students will advance to the finals of the world’s biggest student-led cybersecurity contest: the New York University Tandon School of Engineering’sannual CSAW games. …  The scale of CSAW, in this, its 15th year, is evident in its global reach: 397 finalists from around the world will travel to academic sites across four continents to compete in the final rounds November 8-11, 2018… More than bragging rights are at stake: NYU Tandon will offer more than $1 million in scholarships to all high school finalists in the CSAW Red Team Competition in Downtown Brooklyn. And the NYU Center for Cybersecurity will award full tuition and fellowships to first-place winners in three collegiate-level competitions at all of the hubs. (Scholarships are contingent upon admission to NYU Tandon and satisfactory academic progress.)

NYU’s Tandon Answers Cybersecurity’s Call To Arms

November 1, 2018

It’s estimated that, by the year 2020, there will be around two million open and unfilled jobs in cybersecurity worldwide—currently, the United States faces a 200,000 person shortfall in this critical field. As an answer to Mayor Bill de Blasio’s recent call to create 10,000 cybersecurity jobs within the next decade, the NYU Tandon School of Engineering is taking steps to address the skills gap with the NY Cyber Fellows, an affordable online master’s program designed in collaboration with New York City Cyber Command and such elite partners across a diverse range of industries as Morgan Stanley, IBM Security, and Bridgewater Associates. “When the mayor announced this initiative, we realized that we need to create this workforce,” says Professor Nasir Memon, founder of Tandon’s program in cybersecurity and associate dean for online learning. “We need to create 10,000 experts.”

Beto O’Rourke’s Huge Facebook Bet

November 1, 2018

Article features research by Damon McCoy, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at NYU Tandon.
…Through October 20, O’Rourke alone had spent $5.4 million advertising on the platform, according to Facebook’s Ad Archive Report. J. B. Pritzker, Kamala Harris, Andrew Cuomo, Claire McCaskill, and Heidi Heitkamp had spent $5.5 million total. O’Rourke’s opponent, Senator Ted Cruz, had spent only $427,000 on Facebook, about 1/13th as much as O’Rourke. … According to an analysis of Facebook’s political-ad archive by NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering’s Online Political Ads Transparency Project, the $400,000 that O’Rourke’s campaign spent from September 9 to September 22 generated a minimum of 19.4 million impressions and likely many, many more.

‘Beto for Texas’? ‘Team Nunes’? How to Get Political Ads Off Your Facebook Feed

November 1, 2018

…“We’re seeing some really sophisticated operations,” says Damon McCoy, an assistant professor at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering. Dr. McCoy and his colleagues started analyzing Facebook’s searchable database of these ads after the social network made the tool public in May. … Laura Edelson, a doctoral student at the Tandon School, estimates political-ad spending across Facebook was somewhere between $6.5 million and $38 million from Oct. 21 to Oct. 27, up from a range of $5.9 million to $33 million the week before. Dr. McCoy uses Beto O’Rourke, who is running for U.S. Senate in Texas against incumbent Ted Cruz, as an example of sophistication. “He’s doing these microtargeted ads county by county and giving people detailed [voting] instructions.”

CCS RSAC Security Scholars Announced

November 1, 2018

The brightest minds in cybersecurity connect at RSA Conference. We are pleased to announce Preston Moore and  Mel Savich will participate in the RSACSecurity Scholar Program at RSAC 2019. As scholars, our students will network with peers and industry professionals, take advantage of the opportunity to share current areas of expertise with attendees, and listen to experts across the globe discuss trends and insights. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2PuU94x

 

Distinguished Fellow Judi Germano Joins Third Way Cyber Enforcement Initiative Advisory Board

October 29, 2018

Today, Third Way announced that Judi Germano, Distinguished Fellow at the NYU Center for Cybersecurity and Adjunct Professor of Law at NYU School of Law, will serve on its Cyber Enforcement Initiative Advisory Board. Germano will join a host of cybersecurity experts from both the public and private sector to provide guidance for the new project. Third Way’s Cyber Enforcement Initiative marks the first ever non-partisan public policy initiative dedicated specifically to developing and implementing a comprehensive enforcement strategy against global cyberattackers. In partnership with its distinguished Advisory Board, Third Way will seek to develop and push for policy action aimed at enhancing the government’s cyber enforcement abilities. It also aims to change the narrative around cybersecurity so there is a more robust conversation around identifying, stopping, and punishing attackers through domestic and international cooperation and not just one blaming the victims of attacks. Read Germano’s full profile and explore more information about the initiative.

NYU Fights for Cyber Security

October 28, 2018

… “Some of the biggest consumers of cybersecurity in the world are sitting right here in New York City: the large banks, the financial corporations and these days even the media corporations need cybersecurity,” said Nasir Memon, a professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering and associate dean for Online Learning. “We are the capital of these two industries in the world. The applied learning initiative aims at creating programs that educate a workforce skilled in cybersecurity.” The Cyber NYC program will achieve this in three ways — creating jobs, training workers and helping students innovate.

Biochip Security Needs Spawn Event

October 28, 2018

With security threats on the rise for medical devices, NYU [Tandon School of Engineering] hosted a gathering of researchers exploring novel solutions tailored for the sector. … With the microfluidics segment, driven by healthcare applications, projected to hit $4 billion by 2020, the need for defense measures is growing more acute. “The attack surface is massive,” said Ramesh Karri, professor of electrical and computer engineering at NYU [Tandon], one of the organizers of the Workshop on Secure and Trustworthy Biochips. The August event, co-sponsored by U.S. Army Research Office (ARO), was one of the first conferences to examine biochip security.

Facebook Reveals Its Biggest Political Ad Spenders

October 25, 2018

Facebook is giving more details about who is spending the most money on political ads on its platform, and the leader this election cycle is … Facebook. Facebook calculated its political ad spending to be $12 million, for ads on the social network and Instagram. ..As a report just released by New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering explained: ‘President Donald Trump and his PAC registered the largest number of ads of any candidate, due in large part to the preponderance of small, micro-targeted advertising. Virtually all were aimed at raising funds.’

The Secretive Organization Quietly Spending Millions on Facebook Political Ads

October 25, 2018

Over just two weeks in September, a limited-liability company calling itself News for Democracy spent almost $400,000 on more than 16 million impressions for a network of 14 Facebook pages that hadn’t existed until August. This represented the second-largest political ad buy on Facebook for the period … according to an analysis by a team at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering, led by Damon McCoy.

Political ads study finds the right favors Google, the left Facebook and Twitter

October 24, 2018

… Computer scientists at the New York University (NYU) Tandon School of Engineering analyzed more than 884,000 recent political ads on the three social media sites. They found that Donald Trump and his Make America Great Again political action committee had the largest number of ads of any candidate while a Republican group called the Senate Leadership Fund spent the most on ads. …The report released Monday is part of NYU’s ongoing ads transparency project and offered a look at social media strategies and priorities of different political groups. … “Depending on who you are, the ads you’re going to see are going to be wildly different,” Damon McCoy, assistant professor and co-autho

How Trump, O’Rourke, and the GOP lead the online political advertising race

October 24, 2018

Ever since President Trump’s win in 2016–which many attribute, in part, to his vast online advertising program–many have demanded more transparency for the ads that can be micro-targeted at voters on platforms like Facebook and Google. … A team of data scientists at NYU Tandon, led by professor Damon McCoy, have been crunching all the data they can get about political advertisers on Facebook, Google, and Twitter. In a paper published on Monday, they describe a survey of ads published in a two-week period this past September (it should be noted that all three platforms have different criteria for what they consider “political”). What’s clear is that the three companies’ advertising programs combined create an extremely powerful advertising engine.

Women Leaders in Cybersecurity: At the Intersection of Technology, Privacy, and Security

October 16, 2018

On October 16, 2018, the Center for Cybersecurity hosted the conference Women Leaders in Cybersecurity: At the Intersection of Technology, Privacy, and Security. The event brought together leading women in cybersecurity to address some of the most pressing issues in the field today. It featured topics including data privacy and security, cyber defense, government relations, and the impact of synthetic media on human rights and democracy. Speakers included women leaders from Jigsaw (formerly Google Ideas), Microsoft, Uber, Wickr, ADP, 21st Century Fox, Cisco, Endgame, Palantir and elsewhere, along with high-level former and current government officials and academics.

Full videos of the day’s events have now been posted online.

Breaking Down Walls: Doctoral Candidate Working at Frontier of Cybersecurity and 3D Printing

October 11, 2018

Fei Chen is no stranger to breaking down walls. Since she joined associate professor Nikhil Gupta’s Composite Materials and Mechanics Laboratory (CMML)four years ago as a research student, the NYU Tandon doctoral candidate has been developing pioneering research into 3D printing and cybersecurity. In 2019, Chen will be the first female Ph.D. student to graduate from CMML and as Gupta’s advisee.

Breaking Down Hardware vs. Software Attacks

October 11, 2018

The tech world is reeling from a Bloomberg report that China installed surveillance microchips into tech giants’ hardware. Siddharth Garg, hardware cybersecurity expert, explains the differences between hardware and software attacks and the risks.

Is America’s Next Election Safe From Hackers?

October 11, 2018

Election security is a significant concern going into the midterms, just two years after apparent Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Justin Cappos, Professor at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering joins us to discuss just how safe America’s polls are.

THE OTHER CYBER SKILLS GAP: EDUCATING TOMORROW’S CISOS

October 11, 2018

Founder of New York University (NYU) Tandon School of Engineering’s cybersecurity program and Associate Dean for Online Learning Professor Nasir Memon has been in the thick of cybersecurity education for the last 20 years. He sees some compelling related challenges in executive-level cybersecurity education.

“First, as the CISO function is relatively nascent, we saw a demand from experienced executives for a degree that brings technology skills together with exposure to the intricate policies and regulations that exist today,” says Memon. “The security world is only getting more complex and it is imperative for today’s executives to be well-versed not only in technology, but in the broader-based risks that can impact their businesses.”

Amy Iverson: What to do after Facebook’s massive security breach

October 8, 2018

Hackers getting their hands on access tokens means they could essentially take over people’s accounts.

Damon McCoy, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at New York University, explained to NBC News what cyber criminals might do with the stolen information.

“Some examples of how a Facebook account might have been misused include adding/deleting friends, post, Facebook apps, comments, likes, private messages,” McCoy said. “Any attack could also have changed the privacy setting of any existing content or changed the default privacy setting of future posts, comments, or likes.”

Researchers Turn Tracking Codes into Unclonable “Clouds” to Authenticate Genuine 3D Printed Parts

October 8, 2018

… A team at NYU Tandon School of Engineering has found a way to prove the provenance of a part by employing QR (Quick Response) codes in an innovative way for unique device identification. … Noted materials researcher Nikhil Gupta, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at NYU Tandon; Fei Chen, a doctoral student under Gupta; and joint NYU Tandon and NYU Abu Dhabi researchers Nektarios Tsoutsos, Michail Maniatakos and Khaled Shahin, detail how they exploited the layer-by-layer AM printing process to turn QR codes into a game of 3D chess.

Facebook’s security flaws exposed more than Facebook — here’s what (little) you can do

October 8, 2018

The security issue Facebook announced on Friday has alarmed researchers who say attackers collected information that not only gave access to sensitive information on Facebook, but also could be used to access many websites that use the social network’s ‘Login with Facebook’ function. … Damon McCoy, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at New York University [Tandon School of Engineering] … advised that users check their “Security and Login” settings in Facebook. … McCoy said in an email that attackers could have made any number of changes to compromised accounts. “Some examples of how a Facebook account might have been misused include adding/deleting friends, post, Facebook apps, comments, likes, private messages,” McCoy said.

Extra inventory. More sales. Lower prices. How counterfeits benefit Amazon

October 8, 2018

… China and Hong Kong are the origin of more than 80% of the world’s supply of fake goods, according to the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development. … To open a store, all that’s required is a business name, an address, a phone number, a government-issued ID and an international credit card. The simplicity is by design, said Damon McCoy, a professor of computer science at New York University [Tandon School of Engineering] who has researched the role of bots in the counterfeit trade and has held meetings with Amazon on behalf of brand clients. … “Their stance on counterfeits is often reactive rather than proactive,” he said.

Episode on Netflix Features Damon McCoy

October 1, 2018

Here’s the trailer for an episode of a new cinéma-vérité series, “Follow This,” produced by BuzzFeed. The episode, live today, is about  the nefarious practice of “swatting.” It features Damon McCoy.

Who wears a white hat?

October 1, 2018

“If I wake up and I see millions of vehicles crash due to cyberattacks, I’m going to assume that’s a nation-state actor,” said Justin Cappos, a computer science professor at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering who has worked on methods for securing vehicles from a cyberattack. “It does require certain facilities that a smaller hacking group wouldn’t be able to do.”

Facebook’s security flaws exposed more than Facebook — here’s what (little) you can do

October 1, 2018

Damon McCoy, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at New York University, also advised that users check their “Security and Login” settings in Facebook.

  • Go to Facebook and click on the arrow in the top right.
  • Click on “Settings” and then “Security and Login.”
  • Check “Where you’re logged in” for suspicious sessions. If you see any, click the dots beside the session and then click “Not You?” to report it to Facebook.
  • While there, you can get notifications if someone tries to access your Facebook profile in the section titled “Setting Up Extra Security.”

Feds bust fake document companies

October 1, 2018

Detecting fake documents is hard; the technology to create authentic-looking documents has successfully fooled even sophisticated detection systems. Recently, Fast Company magazine’s Steven Melendez wrote about new technology that can successfully spot fakes, using high-tech software and scanning technology to analyze and compare documents. But, Melendez points out, scammers are likely to respond with ever-better technologies, leading to a sort of arms race. “It’s kind of a cat and mouse game, when the mouse is smart,” noted New York University computer professor Nasir Memon in Melendez’ article.

Exceeding the Limits: 3D Printing

October 1, 2018

Scientists at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering are exploring how high-quality, complex parts could be created by submersible vehicle manufacturers using commercial 3D printers. … Traditionally, syntactic foams have been created from tiny, hollow, glass or ceramic spheres held together by resins or other materials. … The syntactic foam filament used by the NYU team, though, is made from a unique mixture of recycled fly ash spheres embedded in a high-density polyethylene plastic (HDPE). Its spheres are small enough to flow through a commercial 3D printer nozzle, which suddenly—and dramatically— increases their potential uses.

Officials implement new security measures for donations

October 1, 2018

Brendan Dolan-Gavitt, a professor of computer science and engineering at New York University [Tandon School of Engineering], said universities across the country have been utilizing more up-to-date, private-sector security techniques – like standardizing software used across campus – as they have become more invested in cybersecurity. … The University switched over to a dual-factor authentication last fall, requiring GW system users to confirm their identities with codes sent to their phones in addition to their passwords. Officials said at the time that dual-factor authentication would better protect sensitive information from potential cyber attacks by creating a backup barrier in case passwords are compromised.

ARO Workshop on Secure and Trustworthy Biochips Workshop Recap

September 28, 2018

Microfluidic biochips are devices that handle small volumes of fluids and are usually coupled with “cyber” elements such as sensors and intelligent control algorithms to improve performance and reliability. Biochips are coming of age in an era of rampant cybersecurity issues, and new security and trust solutions are the need of the hour. We are organizing a workshop whose overarching goal is to create the understandings and technology to ensure the security and trustworthiness of biochips.

 

Click here to watch workshop videos.

Internal QR codes could thwart counterfeiting of 3D-printed objects

September 20, 2018

Developed by scientists at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering, the system instructs manufacturers’ 3D printers to include hundreds of tiny elements within objects, as they’re being printed. These elements are made up of inert materials, they’re located in various layers within the object, and they reportedly don’t compromise its structural integrity.