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Internal QR codes could thwart counterfeiting of 3D-printed objects

September 20, 2018

Developed by scientists at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering, the system instructs manufacturers’ 3D printers to include hundreds of tiny elements within objects, as they’re being printed. These elements are made up of inert materials, they’re located in various layers within the object, and they reportedly don’t compromise its structural integrity.

What is a chaff bug? How adding bugs to apps may make them more secure

September 14, 2018

Researchers at NYU have developed a technique to add inert bugs in code to deter hackers. But could it work in reality?

Synack and the US Army Draft A New Generation of Cyber Warriors

September 14, 2018

Synack kicked off ThinkCyber, an unprecedented new initiative held in Silicon Valley this summer to develop cyber talent through hands-on workshops and top-tier mentorship. … The program led with mentorship and exchanges between the most talented college students from top technical programs across the nation including MIT, Harvard, and NYU [Tandon School of Engineering], and some of the world’s most talented ethical hackers from the Synack Red Team as well as US Army Cyber Command.

First Ever Female Dean at Tandon Begins New Role

September 14, 2018

In a monumental hiring for the historic technical institute, NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering hired its first female dean since the school’s founding, under a different name, in 1854. Hired last spring, Jelena Kovačević is now presiding over her first week of classes as dean.

Kovačević is the first successor to Katepalli Sreenivasan, who served as the president of NYU-Poly during the 2014 merger between NYU and Polytechnic University and as dean when the school was renamed to Tandon in 2015.

NYU Tandon Joins Top Open-Source Initiative for Automotive Software and Cybersecurity

September 11, 2018

Automobiles, like laptops, can be hacked by malefactors seeking to remotely steal information, damage or hijack a vehicle, or even injure or kill its occupants. One means of incursion is to target over-the-air (OTA) software upgrades for on-board telematics systems or the electronic control units (ECU) for brakes, the engine, airbags and more. The risk of such attacks will only increase, as analysts predict that by 2022, 203 million OTA-enabled cars will roll into dealerships.

Printed parts can prove authenticity with 3D QR codes

September 11, 2018

The worldwide market for 3D-printed parts is a $5 billion business with a global supply chain involving the internet, email and the cloud – creating a number of opportunities for counterfeiting and intellectual property theft. Flawed parts printed from stolen design files could produce dire results. Experts predict that by 2021, 75% of new commercial and military aircraft will fly with 3D-printed engines, airframes and other components, and that the use of 3D printing, or additive manufacturing (AM), in the production of medical implants will grow by 20% per year over the next decade.

Researchers Turn Tracking Codes into Unclonable “Clouds” to Authenticate Genuine 3D Printed Parts

September 11, 2018

The worldwide market for 3D-printed parts is a $5 billion business with a global supply chain involving the internet, email, and the cloud – creating a number of opportunities for counterfeiting and intellectual property theft. Flawed parts printed from stolen design files could produce dire results: experts predict that by 2021, 75 percent of new commercial and military aircraft will fly with 3D-printed engine, airframe, and other components, and the use of AM in the production of medical implants will grow by 20 percent per year over the next decade.

QR CODE ‘CLOUDS’ PROTECT 3D PRINTING FROM PIRACY

September 11, 2018

The worldwide market for 3D-printed parts is a $5 billion business with a global supply chain involving the internet, email, and the cloud—creating a number of opportunities for counterfeiting and intellectual property theft.

Flawed parts printed from stolen design files could produce dire results: experts predict that by 2021, 75 percent of new commercial and military aircraft will fly with 3D-printed engine, airframe, and other components, and the use of AM in the production of medical implants will grow by 20 percent per year over the next decade.

Major 3D-printing breakthrough could keep design pirates at bay

September 11, 2018

Trying to prove who designed and built what in 3D printing was envisaged as costly to major manufacturers, until now.

The amazing aspect of 3D printing is that anyone, anywhere, with the right equipment, can print and build an object almost identical to an already existing one.

Medical and Aerospace 3D Printed Parts Could Be Secured by Embedded QR Codes

September 11, 2018

Experts have predicted that by 2021, 75 percent of new commercial and military aircraft will contain 3D printed parts. That makes it crucial that manufacturers find a foolproof way to ensure that 3D printed components are genuine. Counterfeit parts do a lot more than steal intellectual property – they can be dangerous or even deliberately sabotaged. Much research has gone into coming up with ways to make sure that counterfeit parts can be identified, and that genuine parts can be assured to be genuine. A group of researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have now come up with a new way to protect the integrity of parts by converting QR codes, bar codes, and other passive tags into 3D features hidden inside 3D printed objects.

Researchers Defeat 3D Printing Piracy with Hidden QR Codes

September 11, 2018

Worldwide, the market for 3D printed parts is $5 billion. As a result, intellectual property theft and counterfeiting are rife. But, what can be done to stop this when the global supply chain is online?

Researchers at NYU Tandon and NYU Abu Dhabi believe they have come up with a solution to foil counterfeiters and IP pirates. Their new method of identifying a unique device involves converting QR codes into 3D hidden features.

NYU TEAM ENCODE PARTS WITH 3D PRINTED QR “CLOUDS” TO PREVENT COUNTERFEITING

September 11, 2018

3D printed QR codes are the latest development in the prevention of counterfeitingand intellectual property (IP) theft. Created by an international team of researchers from NYU Tandon, New York, and NYU Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE), these invisible tags can be internally embedded within additive manufactured components, to be read later only by trusted parties.

How to Authenticate a 3D-Printed Part: ‘Explode’ and Embed a QR Code

September 11, 2018

3D-printed parts are increasingly finding their way into airplanes and operating rooms.

Garter experts predict that, by 2021, 75% of new commercial and military aircraft will feature engine and airframe components made through additive manufacturing.

Similarly, the use of 3D-printed medical implants are set to increase by 20 percent over the next decade.

As the role of additive manufacturing emerges in a variety of industries, engineers will need to verify that their 3D-printed part is genuine and works as designed.

A team at NYU Tandon School of Engineering has found a new way to prove the provenance of a part.

First Ever Conference on Biochip Security Sees Risks and Rewards at the Nexus of Biochemical and Electrical Engineering

September 11, 2018

Today there are some 10 billion connected devices — excluding smartphones and computers — and those numbers are growing fast. One driver: mobile applications for medical devices, including biochips (devices that combine biochemistry and electrical and computer processing to run chemical reactions — sometimes many at once at the microscopic level). Paired with microfluidic systems, these “lab on a chip” technologies could revolutionize remote sensors, environmental sampling procedures, and medical tests for coagulation, blood gas electrolytes, hematology, urine chemistry, cardiac markers, and more.

Seeking a new element in artificial intelligence: trust

September 11, 2018

NYU Tandon researchers win NSF grant to develop tools to defend neural networks and machine learning systems from attack and identify security flaws

Mexico, Tunisia Join the World’s Largest Student-Led Cybersecurity Event

September 11, 2018

Registration Open for CSAW Preliminaries in Six Regions Worldwide as Competition Founded by NYU Tandon Enters 15th Year

How an NYU Team Reveals Facebook Political Ad Spending

September 11, 2018

When Damon McCoy, an assistant professor of computer science at NYU Tandon School of Engineering, heard from a friend that Facebook was about to publicize all its political-ad data, he was intrigued. With Facebook under increasing scrutiny for its role in reaching voters through targeted-ad campaigns, the move toward heightened transparency was unprecedented in the social-media industry.

NYU Tandon and Bridgewater Associates Tackle Acute Shortage of Minority Groups in Cybersecurity

September 4, 2018

On August 31, two leading cybersecurity educational and financial institutions will take steps to widen that pipeline. The NYU Tandon School of Engineering will award an initial round of scholarships, funded by Bridgewater Associates, a global leader in institutional portfolio management and the largest hedge fund in the world, to students from under-represented minority groups enrolled in its groundbreaking Cyber Fellows online master’s degree program.

NYU Tandon Trains Students on Blockchain and Joins Automotive Cybersecurity Software Initiative

September 4, 2018

Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering [have] developed Uptane, universal, free, and open-source framework to protect wireless software updates in vehicles, as part of the OTA cybersecurity toolkit for a growing number of automakers and suppliers. Open-source systems, which imprlynove through open security reviews, are an increasingly popular approach to securing OTA updates via Wi-Fi or cellular connections that eliminate the need for drivers to return to dealerships for upgrades.

How to Authenticate a 3D-Printed Part: ‘Explode’ and Embed a QR Code

September 4, 2018

A team at NYU Tandon School of Engineering has found a new way to prove the provenance of a part. Led by Nikhil Gupta, an NYU associate professor of mechanical engineering, the university researchers divided up a QR code and hid the hundreds of pieces throughout the layers of the 3D-printed part.

Major 3D-printing breakthrough could keep design pirates at bay

September 4, 2018

Article cites research by Nikhil Gupta, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at NYU Tandon School of Engineering.
… A team of New York University [Tandon School of Engineering] researchers has found a way to convert flat QR codes into complex features hidden within 3D-printed objects to foil any potential pirates. In a paper published to Advanced Engineering Materials, the team said the method can be applied to QR codes, barcodes and other passive tags. By placing them within the objects, the researchers said it does not compromise the part’s integrity, nor does it make itself obvious to anyone trying to reverse-engineer the part.

Researchers Defeat 3D Printing Piracy with Hidden QR Codes

September 4, 2018

Researchers at NYU Tandon [School of Engineering] and NYU Abu Dhabi believe they have come up with a solution to foil counterfeiters and IP pirates. Their new method of identifying a unique device involves converting QR codes into 3D hidden features. … Nikhil Gupta, an associate professor of mechanical engineering, explains: “To create typical QR code contrasts that are readable to a scanner you have to embed the equivalent of empty spaces … But by dispersing these tiny flaws over many layers we were able to keep the part’s strength well within acceptable limits.”

Why adding bugs to software can make it safer

September 4, 2018

Brendan Dolan-Gavitt, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at NYU Tandon was one of the researchers on this study.
That’s the basis for a new approach developed by Zhenghao Hu and colleagues at New York University. Why not fill ordinary code with benign bugs as a way of fooling potential attackers? The idea is to force attackers to use up their resources finding and testing bugs that will be of no use to them. Hu and co call these decoys “chaff bugs,” in analogy to the aluminum strips used to fool radar operators. The idea is just the latest move in an increasingly complex cat-and-mouse game pitting security experts against attackers.

Could deliberately adding security bugs make software more secure?

August 8, 2018

The best way to defend against software flaws is to find them before the attackers do.

This is the unshakeable security orthodoxy challenged by a radical new study from researchers at New York University. The study argues that a better approach might be to fill software with so many false flaws that black hats get bogged down working out which ones are real and which aren’t.

‘Chaff Bug’ Defense Rolls Out Shiny Objects for Attackers to Find

August 8, 2018

Camouflage and distraction have long been hallmarks of warfare, and it’s no different when it comes to the cyber-front. A group of researchers from New York University are taking the idea further than it’s gone before with the idea of introducing decoy bugs into code – ultimately non-exploitable vulnerabilities that can attract attacker interest and waste their time, thus eating up their resources.

To make systems safer, put more bugs in them

August 8, 2018

          Instead of routinely hunting and killing bugs, new research is proposing the addition of a “chaff bug” in programs to make them safer. By making software “buggier,” hackers could be baited and therefore overwhelmed by the number of bugs in a system and eventually give up their search,

according to a study by researchers Zhenghao Hu, Yu Hu and Brendan Dolan-Gavitt

         of New York University.

Protect your card details, identity from being doxxed

August 8, 2018

A recent study by New York University Tandon School of Engineering and the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) revealed the types of information that is typically exposed by doxxers:

  • 90 percent of the time, the victim’s address is listed
  • 61 percent included a phone number
  • 53 percent included an email address
  • 40 percent shared online user names and IP address

As for sensitive financial information? It’s less common, but it does happen.

  • General financial information was included 8.8 percent of the time
  • 4.3 percent revealed credit card numbers
  • 2.6 included Social Security numbers

Now Transparent: Political Advertising on Facebook, Instagram

August 8, 2018

Conceived by Computer Science and Engineering Assistant Professor Damon McCoy, the Online Political Ads Transparency Project has built easy-to-use tools to collect, archive, and analyze political advertising data. The researchers, including NYU Tandon doctoral student Laura Edelson and Shikhar Sakhuja NYUSH ‘19, pledged to improve the transparency of Facebook’s archive by releasing weekly updates of all political advertisements collected through the November election. The team also plans to use its complex data scraping methods to reveal similar information for Twitter.

Top tip? Sprinkle bugs into your code to throw off robo-vuln scanners

August 8, 2018

Miscreants and researchers are using automation to help them find exploitable flaws in your code. Some boffins at New York University in the US have a solution to this, and it’s a new take on “security through obscurity”.

Why confidence matters in facial recognition systems

August 8, 2018

Nasir Memon, a professor of computer science at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering, said it isn’t realistic to expect these systems to be completely accurate.

Cramming Software With Thousands of Fake Bugs Could Make It More Secure

August 8, 2018

Brendan Dolan-Gavitt, assistant professor at NYU Tandon and one of the researcher on this study, told me in an email that they’ve been working on techniques to automatically put bugs into programs for the past few years as a way to test and evaluate different bug-finding systems. Once they had a way to fill a program with bugs, they started to wonder what else they could do with it.

Twenty-Two Organizations From AI, Automotive, Blockchain, Cloud and More Join The Linux Foundation and Invest in Open Source Technology

August 8, 2018

NYU Tandon School of Engineering empowers people to use science and technology as tools to build a better society. SDNLAB is a leading platform …

High School Women Train in Cybersecurity at NYU School of Engineering

August 8, 2018

Recently, a group of high school women spent three weeks as participants in the Computer Science for Cyber Security (CS4CS) program, picking up fundamentals at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering. Nearly 50 students attended classes at the downtown campus of the university, where they learned about programming, computer architecture, careers in computer science and cybersecurity and how to do professional networking. Now they’re expected to return to their schools and serve as ‘computer science and cybersecurity ambassadors’ and recruit a team of classmates to compete in Cyber Security Awareness Week, Tandon’s annual cybersecurity competition.

A Doozy of a Week for Industry Bosses

August 8, 2018

Article cites research by Damon McCoy, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at NYU Tandon School of Engineering.
President Trump is now officially the biggest political advertiser on Facebook, according to a group of New York University [Tandon School of Engineering] researchers. My colleague Sheera Frenkel reported that the president and his political action committee had spent $274,000 for ads on the social network since early May.

Now Transparent: Political Advertising on Facebook, Instagram

July 18, 2018

The Online Political Ads Transparency Project was conceived by Computer Science and Engineering Assistant Professor Damon McCoy to build easy-to-use tools to collect, archive, and analyze political advertising data. Although Facebook became the first major social media company to launch a searchable archive of political advertising, for both Facebook and Instagram, in May 2018, McCoy found the archive difficult to use, requiring time-consuming manual searches. He decided to apply versions of the data scraping techniques he had previously used against criminals, including human traffickers who advertised and used Bitcoin.

How The Update Framework Improves Software Distribution Security

July 18, 2018

In recent years that there been multiple cyber-attacks that compromised a software developer’s network to enable the delivery of malware inside of software updates. That’s a situation that Justin Cappos, founder of The Update Framework (TUF) open-source project, has been working hard to help solve.

The Biggest Spender of Political Ads on Facebook? President Trump

July 18, 2018

…Damon McCoy, who conducted the study with two fellow researchers, Laura Edelson and Shikhar Sakhuja, said they were not able to tally the total spending for Republicans and Democrats because their analysis was ongoing, though they planned to release those figures in the future.

Justin Cappos on Why Cars Are Not Like Computers When It Comes to Cybersecurity

July 17, 2018

Justin Cappos is a professor in the Computer Science and Engineering department at New York University [Tandon School of Engineering], where his research addresses problems in security, systems, software update systems, and virtualization. His research philosophy focuses on solving real world security problems in practice, with software such as Docker, git, Python, and most Linux distributions using his research advances. The practical impact of his work is why Cappos was named to Popular Science’s Brilliant 10 list in 2013. In this interview, he explores how updates and other security processes are unique to the automotive world.

Reaching greater depths with 3D printing

July 5, 2018

Syntactic foam is a strong and buoyant material commonly used in the manufacturing of submarines. Now, a team of researchers have developed a method of 3D printing components of syntactic foam that could take submarines to greater depths. Nikhil Gupta, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering, joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss this innovation.

Justin Cappos: Security in Kubernetes

June 28, 2018

The New Stack Makers podcast episode Justin Cappos recently recorded with TNS Founder Alex Williams at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2018 is now live on SoundCloud and YouTube, click here to listen.

Fake rental ads are everywhere, and Colorado consumers need to watch out

June 21, 2018

“There is usually something that engenders trust and makes you want to help them,” said Damon McCoy, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering.

Container and Kubernetes Security: It’s Complicated

June 14, 2018

CNCF does not mandate or prescribe a reference architecture for Kubernetes and associated project deployment. However, Justin Cappos, professor in the Computer Science and Engineering department at New York University and leader of the TUF project, said the various projects do tend to communicate with each other.

Breaking Down The AT&T-Time Warner Decision

June 14, 2018

Randal Milch, Former General Counsel and strategic policy advisor to Verizon’s Chairman and CEO. Co-chair of the NYU Center for Cybersecurity.

Hundreds of Apps Can Empower Stalkers to Track Their Victims

June 13, 2018

Damon McCoy’s research on spyware is on the front page the New York Times and jumps to all of page 11. His student, Periwinkle Doerfer, is quoted.

Frequently Published Tandon Materials Scientist Takes to Editing

June 13, 2018

Nikhil Gupta, an associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, has seen his research on 3D printing of syntactic foams, cybersecurity in 3D printing, surgical applications for magnesium, and much more published in premier scholarly journals like the prestigious Journal of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (JOM). Now he is editing two special issues of the journal that highlight cutting-edge research in composite materials…

NYU Center for Cybersecurity Intern Captures Prestigious Intel International Science and Engineering Fair Prize

June 13, 2018

At the 2018 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF), the world’s largest international pre-college science competition, high school student Suha Hussain took home a second-place prize of $1,500 in the Systems Software category for her project “A New Method for the Exploitation of Speech Recognition Systems,” which she completed under the direction of Tandon Professor Ramesh Karri, who co-chairs NYU’s Center for Cybersecurity (CCS), and Tandon Ph.D. candidate Zahra Ghodsi.

Tandon Grad Student Wins Awards for His Computer Science Research

June 13, 2018

How can we identify minute, confusing snippets of code to make programming more efficient? Dan Gopstein, a Ph.D. candidate in NYU Tandon’s Department of Computer Science and Engineering, has in recent months received two distinguished paper awards for publications discussing just that.

Gopstein presented “Atoms of Confusion,” which was prepared under the guidance of Professor Justin Cappos

Now more than ever, cars are just rolling computers

June 13, 2018

Click here to listen to Professor Justin Cappos discuss cybersecurity in the automotive industry.

Uber’s self-driving cars to return to testing tracks

June 13, 2018

‘If there was a war or escalation with a country with strong cyber capability, I would be very afraid of hacking of vehicles. Many of our enemies are nuclear powers but any nation with the ability to launch a cyberstrike could kill millions of civilians by hacking cars,’ warned Justin Cappos,a computer scientist at New York University [Tandon School of Engineering], in an interview given to The Times. ‘It’s daunting. They can send messages to the brakes and shut off the power steering and lock people in the car, and do other things that you wouldn’t want to happen. Once you are in the network you are able to communicate with any device so you could send a message to engage the brakes,’ he added.

Policing modern slavery: Software that detects human trafficking

June 13, 2018

Software can also identify pimps. Damon McCoy of New York University has developed a program that has helped police unearth five big suspected prostitution rings in California and Texas…

Worries grow over privacy, security & tech: NYU Cyber Security Expert Justin Cappos

June 13, 2018

Click here to listen to Professor Cappos’ Podcast.

New York University Scientists Trace Cybercrime Banking Networks and Win Best Research Paper Award

June 13, 2018

The authors, Dr. Damon McCoy and Hongwei Tian of New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering and D. Sean West and Stephen M. Gaffigan of SMGPA found that their research program wasn’t as simple as shooting tracers in the cloud, as the corrupt merchants quickly responded with evasive action.

Finally, an inexpensive vibration sensor that signals blade problems

June 13, 2018

A cleverly simple vibration sensor made of a loop of thin fiber-optic cable and a fixed wavelength laser promises to take cost out of turbine-blade maintenance by letting owners spot problems as they occur. The device, already with two patents, won $150,000 for further development in New York’s PowerBridge competition. “This will let us form the start-up company, LazarOn, to package the sensor, mount it in a turbine, and prove the concept for the early detection of blade damage,” said Dr. Nikhil Gupta, technical lead for the company and Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering.

NYU and NY Cyber Command team up to offer cheap cybersecurity education and training

May 10, 2018

Earlier this year NYU Tandon School of Engineering and New York’s Cyber Command (NYC3) joined forces to announce one of the country’s most affordable Cybersecurity Master’s Degree in the form of its NY Cyber Fellows program. The program was developed to answer Mayor Bill de Blasio’s New York Works initiative to add 10,000 cybersecurity experts to the workforce within a decade and will offer the degree for $15,000 after scholarships for the entire master’s cybersecurity degree program.

That cheap beach vacation rental on Craigslist could be a scam

May 8, 2018

according to a 2016 study from New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering.

Inside New York City Cyber Command

May 8, 2018

A government agency most people know nothing about that’s leading America’s biggest city into the future.

 

When Studying Doxing Gets You Doxed

May 8, 2018

Doxing is a particular form of this harassment in which a victim’s private information is publicly released with the intent of exacting revenge, seeking justice or intimidating the individual. … Unfortunately, doxing can happen to anyone. It even happened to me; following the release of our study, my colleagues and I experienced doxing firsthand. Our physical addresses and links to our social network profiles were posted online, prompting threatening messages.

Ransomware payments, blockchain and cryptoexchanges

May 8, 2018

The murky ecosystem of ransomware payments comes into focus in new research led by Damon McCoy, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering.

Study exposes murky ecosystem of ransomware payments

May 8, 2018

…in May, Damon McCoy, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering and a team…

As Cities Get High-Tech, Hackers Become More Dangerous

May 8, 2018

 

…as once an hour. “It’s somewhat surprising it doesn’t happen more,” says Justin Cappos, a NYU computer science professor who…

NYU Professor Finds $16 Million Impact of Ransomware

April 12, 2018

A recent study co-authored by NYU Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the Tandon School of Engineering Damon McCoy found that ransomware — a type of computer software which encrypts users’ files and does not return them unless payment has been made — has generated approximately $16 million from over 20,000 victims of the cyber attacks throughout the two years the study was conducted.

CYBERSECURITY LECTURE DEBUNKS MYTHS OF FIELD

April 9, 2018

NYU Tandon School of Engineering’s Cybersecurity Lecture Series recently hosted the 10th lecture in its series, which brings together some of the top experts and tech professionals to speak on the latest advances and issues within cybersecurity. Now sponsored by finance and insurance corporation AIG, the lecture comes on the heels of recent global cyber-attacks and ransomware such as Petya, which affected a Ukrainian power grid; WannaCry, which disrupted hospital and school systems; and the 2016 email leak from the Democratic National Committee.

The True Cyber Crime? – Failing to Collaborate

April 5, 2018

Cybersecurity Quarterly – Spring 2018

By Nasir Memon, Associate Dean of Online Learning of NYU Tandon School of Engineering.

With the exponential growth of the Internet of Things and the digital threats to our very democracy in the news on a daily basis, the need for cybersecurity experts is self-evident. …  At New York University Tandon School of Engineering (NYU Tandon), for example, our new Cyber Fellows initiative – an elite, competitive online master’s program – costs just $15,000, thanks to generous scholarships, with no compromises to the high caliber of instruction. We envision it could scale to accommodate hundreds, or even thousands, of students.

Mayor De Blasio Announces NYC Secure, The City’s First-Ever Cybersecurity Initiative To Protect New Yorkers Online

April 5, 2018

Public Now

Mayor de Blasio today announced the launch of NYC Secure, a pioneering cybersecurity initiative aimed at protecting New Yorkers online.  … ‘CyberCrime is sadly a part of our daily reality, and NYU Tandon is eager to continue its partnership with New York City and support Mayor de Blasio’s initiatives that help provide online privacy and security,’ said Nasir Memon, Associate Dean at NYU Tandon School of Engineering.

NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering appoints first female dean

April 5, 2018

Brooklyn Eagle

For the first time in its 164-year history, the former Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn appointed its first female dean yesterday. Jelena Kovacevic was named dean of NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering by President Andrew Hamilton and Provost Katherine Fleming, effective Aug. 15.  Kovacevic, who comes from Carnegie Mellon University — where she is the Hamerschlag University professor, the head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a professor of biomedical engineering — is the first woman to head the school since its founding in 1854.

Inside the Dark World of Trolling

April 4, 2018

Professor Damon McCoy speaks on the dark side of trolling.

Marketing, Cyber Security Professors Weigh in on Cambridge Analytical Scandal

April 4, 2018

Washington Square News

With all of Cambridge Analytica’s lapses, NYU Tandon professor Justin Cappos, who works heavily in cyber security, warns against placing too much of the blame on the data firm, which he likened to a robber and Facebook to a glaringly insecure bank. “Of course, what Cambridge Analytica did was bad but Facebook set up the rules and the system for how this was all supposed to happen,” Cappos said to WSN. “Facebook isn’t in the business of storing data secretly, they’re in the business of gathering information about you and selling it […] to make as much money as possible.”

Why the military needs to take 3-D printer cybersecurity seriously

April 4, 2018

C4ISRNET

The use of 3-D printing in the military is becoming more commonplace, and as a result experts are emphasizing the importance of treating 3-D printers like the hackable machines they are. While a 3-D printer’s capability for experimental on-site manufacturing is far more futuristic than a traditional Wi-Fi enabled printer, the hardware is as vulnerable to cyberattacks as an average laptop or connected printer, said Nikhil Gupta, a New York University [Tandon School of Engineering] associate professor of engineering and materials researcher.

Scientists trace ransomware payments across the globe

April 4, 2018

Futurity

New research brings the murky ecosystem of ransomware payments into focus. Ransomware attacks, which encrypt and hold a computer user’s files hostage in exchange for payment, extort millions of dollars from individuals each month and comprise one of the fastest-growing forms of cyber attack. … Damon McCoy, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at the Tandon School of Engineering at New York University, and his collaborators took advantage of the public nature of the bitcoin blockchain technology to trace ransom payments over a two-year period.

Ransomware payments, blockchain and cryptoexchanges

April 4, 2018

Enterprise Times

The murky ecosystem of ransomware payments comes into focus in new research led by Damon McCoy, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering. … Amongst the most striking findings are: the discovery that South Koreans are disproportionately impacted by ransomware campaigns. … Most ransomware operators used a Russian bitcoin exchange, BTC-E (now seized by the FBI), to convert bitcoin to fiat currencies; the research estimates at least 20,000 individuals made ransomware payments over the past two years, at a confirmed cost of $16 million (the true payment total is likely higher).

More than $16 Million Ransomware Payments Have Been Made in the Past 2 Years

April 4, 2018

Researchers from the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have studied ransomware payments learning that $16 million in ransomware payments have been tracked in the past two years by researchers with South Korea paying about $2.5 million as the country has been hard hit by the impact of ransomware. … ‘Ransomware operators ultimately direct bitcoin to a central account that they cash out periodically, and by injecting a little bit of our own money into the larger flow we could identify those central accounts, see the other payments flowing in, and begin to understand the number of victims and the amount of money being collected,’ says Damon McCoy, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering and who led the research.

Which Russia hack? Part 1

April 4, 2018

Carbonite – Breach (podcast series)

Damon McCoy, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at NYU Tandon at 19:18.

… In this episode of Breach, we attempt to connect the dots between the Yahoo security breach, the DNC hack and efforts to undermine the U.S. presidential election on social media. And while we didn’t find evidence of a direct link, it’s clear that all three can be connected to the larger Russian cybersecurity playbook.

How to Protect Today’s Highly Computerized Cars from Hackers (video)

April 4, 2018

Interview with Justin Cappos, associate professor of Computer Science and Engineering at NYU Tandon, at 7:50.

“Certainly as these systems get more and more complex there are more and more opportunities for hackers,” said Cappos. “It’s not clear whether having cars that drive themselves or have advanced safety systems are more at risk or less at risk … safety systems may actually reduce risks as they fight hackers.”

Opening Arguments Begin In AT&T And Time Warner Merger Case

March 22, 2018

The telephone and Internet giant AT&T wants to buy the media conglomerate Time Warner. President Trump has opposed this $85 billion deal, and the U.S. Justice Department is in federal court to try and stop it. The opening arguments are scheduled to begin this week…. [Center for Cybersecurity Co-Chair Randy] Milch says a judgment against AT&T may well ice future corporate deals.

Randy Milch, CCS Co-Chair and Judi Germano, CCS Senior Fellow to speak at PCCE Cybersecurity Conference

March 21, 2018

On behalf of the NYU School of Law Program on Corporate Compliance and Enforcement (PCCE), we would like to invite you to our upcoming conference, Global Cyber Threats: Corporate and Governmental Challenges to Protecting Private Data on April 6, 2018 at the Lester Pollack Colloquium Room, 9th Floor, Furman Hall, 245 Sullivan Street, New York, New York.

 

The conference is an off-the-record event and is invitation only. In order to attend, you must pre-register.

OSIRIS Lab Welcomes First Female Hacker-In-Residence

March 15, 2018

NYU Tandon’s Offensive Security, Incident Response and Internet Security Laboratory, well known as the OSIRIS Lab, recently welcomed a new hacker-in-residence: Sophia d’Antoine, a Senior Security Researcher at Trail of Bits.

Professor Nikhil Gupta’s lab develops breakthrough 3D-printed foam

March 15, 2018

… Only 5 percent of the Earth’s oceans have been explored, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. But that could be changing, thanks in part to a new development by researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering. Coming out of the lab of Professor Nikhil Gupta

Pay Us Bitcoin or Never See Your Files Again…

March 15, 2018

A study by researchers at Google, Chainalysis, University of California San Diego and NYU Tandon School of Engineering estimated that from 2016 to mid 2017, victims paid $25 million in ransom to get files back. CSE Professor, Damon McCoy’s research was referenced in this article.

Justin Cappos, Associate Professor, featured on PBS Sci Tech

February 26, 2018

Professor Cappos’ segment on PBS Sci Tech will be airing ­­on 3/26/18 on WLIW at 7:30pm. It will repeat on 3/28/18 at 5:30pm and 4/01/18 at 6pm. Additionally, the show will be posted to http://scitechnow.org/ following the first airing.

Damon McCoy, Assistant Professor, Sat on FTC Information Injury Workshop

February 26, 2018

Professor McCoy described his research with doxing, which is the public release of people’s information and other methods of social engineering that collect personal information. His research indicates that the use of this data can be innocuous or harmful if it is used for extortion or other stalking purposes.

Cyber Fellows Master’s Program Highlighted in City & State New York Article

February 26, 2018

Professor Nasir Memon talked about the city’s and industries’ strategies to find and recruit more qualified personnel. As part of the strategy, the two mentioned the “Cyber Fellowship” initiative; a master’s program in cybersecurity.

Nasir Memon, Co-Founder of NYU CCS, featured in The Bridge BK Podcast

February 20, 2018

Professor Memon, a pioneer in computer science, spoke on The Bridge BK podcast about how he aims to make the field affordable and open to all. Click the link to listen.

NYU Tandon Student, Abdullah Alharbi, Featured In Nature Nanotechnology

February 6, 2018

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Electrical and Computer Engineering Student, Abdullah Alharbi’s work on the application of 2D materials for security was featured as a research highlight in Nature Nanontechnology. Click to read more…

NYU Tandon and New York City Cyber Command Launch New York Cyber Fellows Master’s Degree Program

January 26, 2018

New York University Tandon School of Engineering, in partnership with New York City Cyber Command, today launched the New York Cyber Fellows, a unique, affordable online cybersecurity master’s degree program designed in conjunction with leading New York City employers to address the acute shortage of highly trained technical professionals in the city and nation.

Car Hacking Remains a Very Real Threat as Autos Become Ever More Loaded with Tech

January 21, 2018

Automakers and suppliers are making progress in protecting vehicles from cyber attacks, but the car-hacking threat is still real and could get increasingly serious in the future when driverless vehicles begin talking to each other. … Justin Cappos, a computer science professor at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering, said one of the more promising ways to stay ahead of hackers is through regular over-the-air software updates to fix vulnerabilities as soon as they become known.

A New Way To Track Down Bugs Could Help Save IOT

January 18, 2018

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On a clear day this summer, security researcher Ang Cui boarded a boat headed to a government biosafety facility off the northeastern tip of Long Island. … “Right now we haven’t seen much of it because there are so many IoT systems already out there with even more trivially exploitable problems like default passwords,” says Brendan Dolan-Gavitt, a software analysis and embedded device researcher at New York University [Tandon School of Engineering]. “So until those become more scarce, I wouldn’t expect attackers to expend effort.”

Americans Concerned About Cybersecurity of Self-Driving Cars

January 18, 2018

Many Americans are concerned about potential cyber risks to self-driving cars, though the public is more comfortable with the industry’s overall safety than in the past, Morning Consult polling shows. … Justin Cappos, a systems and security professor at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering, said the inherent vulnerabilities in most connected devices — including autonomous vehicle technology — shouldn’t necessarily influence consumers’ opinions about the safety of driverless cars.

IBM Joins New York Cyber Fellows Program to Address Cyber Skills Shortage

January 17, 2018

The growing workforce shortage in the cybersecurity industry is no secret, with thousands of job currently open and a shortfall of nearly 2 million workers anticipated in the next several years. … As part of these efforts, IBM Security works with hundreds of higher education programs around the world on skills, training and recruitment initiatives. Last week IBM expanded those efforts by joining a new program founded by New York University (NYU) Tandon School of Engineering, in partnership with New York City Cyber Command (NYC3).

BlackBerry in Motion: Firm Aims to Secure Cars From Hackers

January 17, 2018

BlackBerry mobile devices are a rare sight. But you may still be using the company’s technology – in your car. … Static binary code scanning tools are good at finding obvious vulnerabilities in code, says Damon McCoy, an assistant professor in the computer science and engineering department at New York University [Tandon School of Engineering]. McCoy, who has not analyzed Jarvis, says BlackBerry may have a bit of an edge given its experience with embedded systems.

BlackBerry in Motion: Firm Aims to Secure Cars From Hackers

January 17, 2018

Static binary code scanning tools are good at finding obvious vulnerabilities in code, says Damon McCoy, an assistant professor in the computer science and engineering department at New York University. McCoy, who has not analyzed Jarvis, says BlackBerry may have a bit of an edge given its experience with embedded systems. But it’s also possible that BlackBerry might lag competitors’ sophistication when it comes to the algorithms they use to find potential vulnerabilities.

With More Tech Comes More Hacking Risk for Smart Cars

January 16, 2018

Automakers and suppliers are making progress in protecting vehicles from cyberattacks, but the car-hacking threat is still real and could get increasingly serious in the future when driverless vehicles begin talking to each other. … Justin Cappos, a computer science professor at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering, said one of the more promising ways to stay ahead of hackers is through regular over-the-air software updates to fix vulnerabilities as soon as they become known.

Car Hacking Remains a Very Real Threat as Autos Become Ever More Loaded With Tech

January 13, 2018

Automakers and suppliers are making progress in protecting vehicles from cyber attacks, but the car-hacking threat is still real and could get increasingly serious in the future when driverless vehicles begin talking to each other. … Justin Cappos, a computer science professor at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering, said one of the more promising ways to stay ahead of hackers is through regular over-the-air software updates to fix vulnerabilities as soon as they become known.

NYU Tandon offers affordable cybersecurity master’s degree with backing from NYC

January 11, 2018

With everything from Russian hackers to credit card fraud becoming very much a 21st century problem, a door of opportunity has just opened for New York City students hoping to get into one of the hottest fields on the planet. New York University Tandon School of Engineering in Downtown Brooklyn is partnering with the city to launch an affordable online cybersecurity master’s degree program.

NYU Tandon and NYC Cyber command launch a new cybersecurity Master’s Program

January 11, 2018

New York City is now home to a cybersecurity master’s degree program, launched as a joint effort between New York University (NYU) Tandon School of Engineering and New York City Cyber Command. This program, dubbed the New York Cyber Fellows, is an online initiative created in conjunction with leading employers within New York City, aiming to alleviate an acute shortage of highly-trained cybersecurity professionals that has become an increasingly relevant problem for both the jurisdiction and the rest of the nation.

NYU Launches Cybersecurity Master’s Program to Help Fill Skills Gap

January 10, 2018

Cybersecurity threats are a serious issue, but the field is lacking experts who can prevent or handle such hacks. … One estimate predicts that the world will see a global shortage of 1.8 million cybersecurity experts by 2022.To help fill this skills gap, New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering has launched the New York Cyber Fellows, an online master’s program for cybersecurity education that costs $15,000 — the least, the school said, of any cybersecurity master’s program in New York City.

The Worst Healthcare Cybersecurity Breaches of 2017

December 29, 2017

In 2017, a spate of high-profile attacks brought the healthcare industry’s need to strengthen its cybersecurity into sharp focus. Ransomware, like WannaCry and NotPetya, has wreaked havoc in small hospitals and biopharma giants alike, and the vulnerabilities appear widespread and acute, experts said. … “If you were hit by WannaCry, you were really doing something very wrong,” said Justin Cappos, PhD, associate professor of systems and security at [the NYU Tandon School of Engineering] Computer Science and Engineering Department.

2018: The Year Of Blockchain For Ad Industry?

December 29, 2017

Blockchain technology emerged in the advertising industry as a sort of phenomenon in 2017. Companies like IBM and Microsoft are betting big on the technology that seems to be pumping new life into some of the more established players and retailers, such as Oracle and Walmart. .. In July 2017, Google researchers reported that Chainalysis, UC San Diego, and the NYU Tandon School of Engineering used blockchain to track $15 million in ransomware.

3D Printing Industry Review Of The Year May 2017

December 27, 2017

A month of celebration – in May we held the first ever annual 3D Printing Industry Awards and hosted a gala dinner of esteemed guests including Siemens, 3D Systems, Ultimaker, Zortrax, Desktop Metal, Shining 3D, Markforged, Zortrax, Sinterit, HP, Dassault Systèmes, DWS, Autodesk, Polymaker and UCL. … And a team at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering, published a paper of interest to high-risk manufacturing describing a method on adding deliberate mistakes to .stl files as a means of security.

CCS and C2SMART Center Post-Doc Opportunity

December 20, 2017

The C2SMART Center and the NYU Center for Cybersecurity (cyber.nyu.edu) are jointly seeking to hire a Post-doctoral fellow to conduct state-of-the art research on emerging transportation cybersecurity problems.
With the emergence of connected and autonomous vehicles as well as the increasing levels of automation of all transportation systems, there is a growing recognition of cybersecurity threats to all of the transportation system components including vehicles, users, and cyber and physical infrastructures. This candidate will work closely with faculty and students in:

  • Researching and identifying cybersecurity issues faced in automated implementations of transportation systems
  • Developing multi-disciplinary solutions targeted at intrusion detection and vulnerable transportation infrastructure
  • Preparing and designing protocols designed to ensure automated systems and platforms are adequately identifying and preparing for cybersecurity threats
  • Leading outreach efforts for increasing agency awareness of transportation cybersecurity
Applications should be submitted at: https://apply.interfolio.com/48019

NYU Tandon Becomes a Center of Influence in the World of Hardware Security

December 6, 2017

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Since 2002, when NYU Tandon Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Ramesh Karri and his students generated the first research on attack-resilient chip architecture, the school has been at the forefront of this vital field, demonstrating before anyone else that integrated circuits’ test and debug ports could be used by hackers; delivering the first set of invited Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) tutorials in hardware security in the U.S., Europe, and Latin America; and presenting the first research paper on split manufacturing, a means of thwarting counterfeiting by an untrusted foundry by dividing a chip’s blueprint into several components and distributing each to a different fabricator; among other such accomplishments.